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AldoShllaku

Aldo Shllaku- Film Composer, Canadian, Expat

Think of a movie that truly moved you.  Try to remember the scenes that had an significant impact on you.  Recall the emotional response you experienced during those sections of the film.  Although you may not remember the soundtrack specifically, without a doubt, if you were to sit in a room and watch those scenes again without any music, you would be disappointed.  On the other hand, if you were to play that soundtrack by itself without images, the emotions felt at the time you watched the film would come flooding back.  Such is the power of the soundtrack.  It does far more than accompany the actors on screen, it enhances or even creates the emotion the director is attempting to convey to the audience.  So vital is the music of a film that without it, everything lays flat, two dimensional and empty.   

Read more: Aldo Shllaku- Film Composer, Canadian, Expat

Individuals smallIf you are like most Canadians living abroad, you are an adventurist soul. You have moved abroad to learn about the people, the culture and perhaps the language of the country that you are now living in. I would encourage you to maintain that spirit of adventure. One of the last things that you had perhaps considered was to join an expat group. However, joining one could prove key to your ability to integrate into your adopted society.  A social network of fellow expats can be a resource to lean on in the time of need and a resource to tap into when you need information.  I would whole heartedly encourage you to consider exploring the expat groups that are in your community. Here are some reasons to seek out an Expat group:

Read more: Joining an Expat Group While Abroad

CanadianWritersAbroadSince November 2011, the website Canadian Writers Abroad has been promoting exactly that: Canadian writers who live and work abroad.

Before Canadian Literature got going in the 1960s, Canadians who wanted to publish sent their work to either the United Kingdom or the United States. Often they went too. Morley Callaghan, Mavis Gallant, Margaret Laurence, and Mordecai Richler wrote their early work from Europe. But Mavis Gallant was the only one to stay – she remained in Paris until her death in 2014. Until Gallant published a book of stories set in Canada, Home Truths, which won the Governor General’s Literary Award in 1981, she was relatively unknown in Canada. Out of sight out of mind.

Read more: Canadian Writers Abroad

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