The Canadian Expat Is Seeking Your Help

At our core, The Canadian Expat believes the community of Canadians living abroad is an integral part of Canada. Not only does this community provide value to the individuals that call themselves Expats, it also provides value to the rest of Canada and to all Canadians.  This value is represented economically, culturally and politically.  We believe, without a doubt, that protecting the rights of Canadians abroad is a step towards protecting the rights of all Canadians, regardless of where they currently reside.  More about our values, mission & vision

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Pastel Pink ‘Babe’

petra collins feature rex 2If you haven't yet heard of Canadian Expat Petra Collins you might have missed the Time magazine article she was featured in, the Adidas commercial she directed or the Levi's one. Maybe you missed her contributions to Vogue, Elle, Dazed & Confused, and L'Officiel magazines. Without really noticing, you may have walked past her face in the Calvin Klein ad campaign she was featured in, or the Gucci one. Maybe you live under a rock, inside a cave or under the sea, or maybe you just have to ask a teenaged girl, who knows.

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The Canadian Expat Seeking Intervenor Status

Cdn Expat logo 2014As some of you may know the Supreme Court of Canada is going to hear the case of Gillian Frank, et al. v. Attorney General of Canada. The outcome of this hearing will determine if Canadian Citizens who are non-residents are allowed the right to vote in a federal election.

At the Canadian Expat, we believe every Canadian citizen, regardless of whether they live in Canada or not, has the right to take part in the democratic process.

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Knit in New York

Although the idea of hand-knit, basket-woven pompoms typically beckons the image of dear old grandma and her sweaters made just in time for the holidays (and the obligatory smile and you shouldn’t KnitOnHeadSmallhave’s), in New York City, we find a Canadian Expat and designer with a contemporary approach to the tradition. Originally hailing from Vancouver, Tia Oliver’s carefully crafted crochet handbags and travel items are catching the eyes of fashionistas in the U.S. as well as back home in Canada. The signature pompoms, all-natural recycled materials, fine-wood detailing and intricate designs add a fashionable element to a skill that’s been customarily reserved for dear ol’ grandma.

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Drawing the Future

Since the 1960s, Anime has been a global cultural phenomenon that has captivated legions of fans beginning with the cultural classic ‘Astro Boy’ released in North America in 1963. Continuing sheer innovative and imaginative storytelling, like 2001’s Oscar winning animated picture ‘Spirited Away’, Japanese animation is a force in storytelling and artistry that is truly unique in scope. But as we come to learn from a Canadian expert currently residing in Tokyo, the phenomenon is much more than just animation.

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The Case for Welcoming Canadians Home

When most of us grew up, Canadian law aligned with Canadian values -- birth on Canadian soil or birth to Canadian parents granted citizenship. But in 2009, Bill C-37 came into force with a provision that limits citizenship by descent to the first generation born abroad. For Canadians abroad, this means that their contributions to Canada and the world may come at the expense of their children’s or grandchildren’s citizenship.  

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Deathly Success in Japan

For westerners making the Far East their home, the experience is as thrilling as one could imagine, albeit discombobulating at times. It may seem like the farthest place from home butJapanPhoto Japan offers the same welcoming environment that is recognizably and characteristically Canadian. This may be due to Canadians and Japanese people sharing the same common thread of politeness as a cultural value. This distinctive attitude, which is internationally recognized in the identity of the two nations, allows people in both countries to understand each other beyond cultural differences. For Canadians coming to Japan, the experience is like finding a home away from home --one they never knew was waiting for them. A place filled with the same friendly good days (or konichiwas), as well as apologetic excuse me’s, pardon me’s or the ubiquitous Canadian ‘sorry’ (or sumimasen in Japanese).

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Aldo Shllaku- Film Composer, Canadian, Expat

AldoShllaku

Aldo Shllaku- Film Composer, Canadian, Expat

Think of a movie that truly moved you.  Try to remember the scenes that had an significant impact on you.  Recall the emotional response you experienced during those sections of the film.  Although you may not remember the soundtrack specifically, without a doubt, if you were to sit in a room and watch those scenes again without any music, you would be disappointed.  On the other hand, if you were to play that soundtrack by itself without images, the emotions felt at the time you watched the film would come flooding back.  Such is the power of the soundtrack.  It does far more than accompany the actors on screen, it enhances or even creates the emotion the director is attempting to convey to the audience.  So vital is the music of a film that without it, everything lays flat, two dimensional and empty.   

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